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, and convincing these middle- class people that government had been identified with the interests of minorities and the poor and was not working for them anymore and luring them over to become the republican base. that title gets a lot of attention, because we have seen such a rationalized -- such a campaign, particularly as mitt romney and paul ryan use welface that is -- use a version of welfare that is blackface. it may not be working for them. tavis: the subtitle is no less provocative. "why we long for a golden age that never was." a majority of americans that believe our best days are behind us. there are many who believe that maybe the 21st century belongs to china or somebody else. it ain't ours. what do you say to that? >> the tragic thing about this is that there is a loss of confidence in the future. there was a golden age for a lot of white people. not all. but when i tell the story with my family, i show how my grandparents climbed out of desperate poverty in the depression into the middle class really in one generation, and some of their children proceeded into what may be called
. the two firms denied being influenced by the chinese government. john sudworth is in shanghai. what is the reaction there to this congressional hearing? >> there's been a statement out by the chinese foreign ministry suggesting that the chinese telecommunications companies operate within the law, but they have gained their success through their own commercial competitiveness and that they should not be singled out by u.s. congressional committees for criticism in this way. so it appears the chinese government is already lining up in defense. this is a damning report from an official body singling out two companies by name and suggesting that they simply have not done enough over the course of this investigation to demonstrate that they are free from influence from beijing. >> my understanding is the foreign ministry has done slightly more than just condemn this. have they not said this is the result of some kind of prejudice in america of chinese companies? >> in a sense, that is in the context in which there is a kind of growing focus on the issues of their trade and open access. i
. it is not. >> the man there says it is time for governments off to act. he said the biggest risk is the euro zone. private sector money pulled out from peripheral economies in the region back into the core ones. that is pushing up borrowing costs for government, banks, countries, italy and spain. this he is says feeding a further downturn to. reap ver to reverse the situation is well timed fiscal consolidation and they need to do this reducing excessive debts. economists fame size steps need to be take in to boost foundations beneath banks they hope the european stability and bond buying program will help rebuild investor confidence. they suggest a unified system to supervise banks must be m playment pla -- implemented. economists point to japan as a risk. they project bank holdings of government bonds could increase to a third of total assets in five years. institutions could suffer heavy losses if interest rates rise. now the imf report suggests banks need a further boost to their balance sheets. and it said the japanese government should take tougher measures to deal with its budget probl
to their problems around the world. huddled in twos, threes, dozens, in board rooms, government buildings and hotels. hundreds have met together at annual meetings in tokyo of the international monetary fund and the world bank. and ron madison has been watching the meetings all week. ron, tell uh what is happening there today. >> reporter: we have been reporting on their, attempts to solve their economic challenges all week. in terms of reporting talking about that for quite a few years now. it is something to see hundred of people, some of the leading financial mind in the world to walk into a conference hall and all sit done together. today they filed into the plenary session at tokyo international forum and addressed the challenges of the debt crisis and the effects of that face to face. the director of the international monetary fund, challenged kol le ed colleague crisis behind them. urged them to complete the reform and in making changes urging them to remember those who are less privileged. >> there is a tough road ahead to transform your optimism. my optimism, your optimism into reality. but
, the government will have to show it can protect this girl. the threat has not been lifted. >> that's right. we have heard statement after statement from the pakistani taliban justifying how they carried out the assassination attempt on a schoolgirl, saying they had held a council and decided because she had harmed their cause through her work, that it was illegal to kill her in its long. they said they will not spare her. -- that it was legal to kill her in islam. so she is still in danger. >> thank you. still to come, we bring you a special report from western syria in an area which remains largely untouched by the violence. away from danger. the mexican authorities are concerned that the leader of a notorious drug cartel has been killed. while admitting that his course has been stolen, they said forensic tests have proved the identity of the man who led the it task cartel before armed gang snatched his body from a funeral parlor. -- the zetas. >> the news from the mexican government point of view was mixed. on the positive side, they brought down a major player in the drug war, in a shootout
governments, really they're overwhelmingly focused on domestic issues. s europeans are dealing with nothing but crisis in europe for the last three years. that's going to continue. that's occupying everything. the americans have an election coming up in four weeks. and there's much less interest in the united states in being the world's policemen or lender of last resort. japanese, you have prime minister every week. i mean, the level of consistency in governments here is just not feasible. and so really that does limit what can be done in any of these four. look, the longer the g-0 persists the more dangerous. so the persistence of the g-0 does lead to the creation of a new system. this is not a new world order. this is in between. precisely because you can't deal with the middle east conflicts in a g-0 world. you're not dealing with climate effectively in the g-0 world. new things will emerge. looking at the nape of the middle east right now, looking at how deep the european crisis is, how unwilling americans are to look outside their borders today, how much transportation is required wit
what we're seeing is a government seeking to assure its key constituents and to send a signal to the outside world in the face of what they consider pressure from the south and the government is strong and the national security of the north korea the safe. >> it's given that the south has only increased its missile capacity. >> absolutely. and i think we need to trecks last few months have been very tense on the korean peninsula, and there's been no love lost and the outgoing president is seen as someone who is hostile to the north and that certainly is how the knot paints him. this is very much a political gang waiting for the political senses of december and north koreans are not going to give an inch until they see the new president taking over in january. but for now, as you say, they have every reason to take a tough stance. >> thank you for your time on gmt. let's take a look at some of the other stories making hirnes around the world today. mexican authorities say the leader of the drug cartel appears to have been killed in a fire fight with marines. final forensic test
responding to what appear to be stray syrian shells. turkey's government has put its military on a high state of readiness. russia wants an explanation from turkey about last night's event, and syria has described the incident has an act of piracy. the cargo had been legit moot and accused the turkish authorities of using aggression against the crew before they were able to leave. >> james reynolds is in the turkish city near the syrian border. let's pick up, james, on what peter was talking about right at the end there. obviously the syrians contesting what was in this cargo. to be honest we only have the turkish authority's word for that it's imlegal? >> yeah, george, the interesting thing is is this, none of the public has seen the cargo. turkey hadn't put it on display. we have the word of the turk yirk prime minister that the cargo was objectionable. some have tried to fill in the blanks there. one newspaper says 10 containers were confiscated. but the director of syrian arab airlines, the airline that had to stop says that all the cargo was legal, and he wants it back. >> and james, now
. presenting a summary, two of the jurists said israeli violations were impossible without u.s. government backing. >> the tribunal finds that israel's ongoing colonial settlement expansion, its racial separatism policies, as well as its violent militarism would not be possible without the united states economic military and diplomatic support. >> the russell tribunal session here in new york will give us the opportunity to further persuade people who believe in justice and equality and peace in this country that they should join the campaign for solidarity with palestinian people and palestinian freedom. the ousted president mohamed nasheed after he ignored a summons to appear in court. he is facing charges of illegally ordering the arrest of a judge appointed by gayoom, who ruled the maldives for 30 years before nasheed became its first democratically elected president in 2008. nasheed was ousted earlier this year in what he described as a coup at gunpoint by gayoom's supporters. nasheed is well known internationally for his activism on the issue of global warming, which he says threaten
needed the u.s. government and we were in a position to tell the banks, let's go back to the social function, very important social functions. the banks have to provide in our society. and we lost that moment. >> rose: and the condition of the banks today is, of the big banks in wall street. >> well, to be frank, we really aren't sure because there's not the kind of transparency that we need. like one of my criticisms of dodd frank, we kept a lot of, for instance, these derif deriff-- derivative transparents. >> they made them a lit bit more. >> but as long as you have so much money at stake where you don't know what is at risk, you know, let me just give you one example. there are about 3 to 350 trillion dollars of derivatives that are based on libor. libor we now know is a-- number. >> explain what that is. >> the london interbank lending rate. so it's the rate, supposed to be an arm's length rate at which unone bank lends to each other. but the banks aren't lend fog each other s so what does it mean? it's a concept-- what rate do we think some other bank would lend to us. and we
feeling is that the spanish government totally rejected what is happening here. they spread rejection and hate with comments calling us the damned catalan that does not want to cooperate. >> there are feelings to be a lot better off if they were not part of spain. it put this together, i think we are relatively close to reaching our goal -- if you put those together. i think we are on the right path. >> but catalonia is a path often dreamed of but never taken. the regional government wants at the very least fiscal autonomy. they called a snap election and threatened to hold a referendum on independence, but could this iconic spanish city ever leave spain? at the headquarters of the ruling party, i talked to one of the men who decide that. of the union party that runs the region. >> it is a difficult moment in a rich land that between 8% of 9% of our gdp every year to spain. the result is not happy at all because there are double the cuts in terms of social services, health services, double cups of the rest of spain and double taxes. that is a really big imbalance. we must solve that.
about revenge and this kind of stuff. guess who does more than anybody? our leaders, our government, the people who are supposed to run everything. >> first, the european union wins the nobel peace prize. we will speak with tariq ali, commentator and writer. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are on our 100-city tour, broadcasting from albuquerque, new mexico. vice-president joe biden and republicangress member and vice presidential nominee paul ryan squared off in the first and only vice presidential debate thursday night with a series of lively exchanges over domestic and foreign policy. joe biden was seen as playing a more aggressive role in a debate that saw sharp critiques on both sides. topics ranged from medicare and abortion to iran. the deadly attacks on the u.s. embassy in libya featured prominently in the debate with ryan criticizing the administration over what he said was a lack of embassy security. >> imposing these devastating defense cuts for it what that does when we equivocate we
protections that this federal government provides for them. >> but some employers are still taking advantage, and in the case of home health workers there are concerns about abuse continuing as the baby boomer population ages. solis says the solution is education so people don't get stuck in dead end jobs. >> one of the things i know we're doing is looking at trying to provide a career path, so i know that there's a great interest to see that individuals in that industry are able to get certified so that they can meet certain qualifications and there's actually a career ladder for that, so we're very supportive of that. we've actually funded different grangrants that work with the industry as well as community-based groups and schools to try to that to maket we can get women, because it's predominantly women, to get to thaintothose careers so they caa certificate and they can go beyond and achieve a stepping stone so that they're not just stuck in a rut at a particular wage but they actually can look at increasing their wages and hopefully maybe even running their own particular business. >
is not necessarily improved. so says a brand new study funded by the british government. the study found that older, cheaper, generic drugs were treating mental illness were better across-the-board than newly marketed medications. when it comes to prescription drugs, how can you tell when new really means improved? we'll ask dr. sharon levine. >>> new study i referred doctor sharon levine, from san francisco, associated executive director of kaiser permanenty. that new study refers to schizophrenia and the new drug it was found is better than the existing drug, right? >> yes, that's right this. is a very important studdy and it demonstrated in a large population that the older antipsychotic drug, heldol, was more affective than the newer category called a typical antipsychotics. and it really speaks to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new means improved. and in fact, what is really true is that needs to be established by solid evidence and not just assumption. this is a very important study for the federal government. very important study for state gove
. cubans feel betrayed. for them, it was like the soviet government made one concession after another to the americans and never consulted their own cuban allies. >> -christoph -- nikita khrushchev immediately dispatched his most trusted, the deputy premier, to havana. >> he was sent to to vote with the goal of healing the wounds and to influence castro. castro refuses to meet with the premier for several days. he begins to understand the breadth of the humiliation the cubans are experiencing. >> for the premier to rise to the center of government, the request drew on personal trauma. >> on the day of his arrival, his wife died. castro said to him -- "go back to your wife's funeral." with great sadness -- he had been married many years -- since his son back to the soviet union to the funeral. he stays and meets with the cuban leadership. >> 1 finally granted his audience with castro, he found cuba to be a bundle of conspiracy theories. with clear instructions from khrushchev, he conveyed the soviet offer intended to placate castro. you can keep the tactical nuclear weapons. just don't
condition after undergoing surgery to remove a bullet from her skull. the pakistani government has offered a bounty of over $100,000 for the capture of those who shot her. in russia, a court has freed one of three jailed members of the punk protest group pussy riot, but upheld prison sentences for the other two. in a case that has drawn international attention, the women were found guilty of hooliganism motivated by religious hatred after performing a punk prayer inside the cathedral the sort in the virgin mary to get rid of russian leader vladimir putin. yekaterina samutsevich was released on wednesday after lawyers argued she played less of a role in the protests because she was ejected from the cathedral before she could remove her guitar from its case. at a court hearing, yekaterina samutsevich apologized to church members offended by the actions in the intended target had been vladimir putin and russian elites. >> dear believers, we did not want to insult you. we never had such intentions. we went to the cathedral to voice our protest against the political elite of our country. >> the
loans that ultimately cost the federal government hundreds of millions of dollars in insurance claims. wells fargo is alleged to abuse the federal housing ministration program by recklessly handing out loans and forcing the government to foot the bill when borrowers could not pay. in a statement, a u.s. attorney in new york said -- the suit comes two months after wells fargo agreed to pay a settlement for at least $175 million for discriminating against african-american and latino borrowers. the head of turkey's military is ruling to respond with more attacks if mortar fire from syria continues to hit turkish territory. speaking earlier today, turkey's chief of staff said turkish forces would use "greater force" in the event that shelling from syria hits the turkish side of the border turkey has launched strikes inside syria and deployed additional troops to its border after shelling last week from syria killed five turkish civilians. at a summit in belgium, the nato secretary general said his military alliance is prepared to act against syria to defend turkey, but declined to specify
to continue to fund and support these governments. i think that's a very legitimate point. but on the one hand, he says -- you know, he blames obama for whatever tension there is in the u.s./israel relationship today and i would argue there's very little tension in the state-to-state relationship but a lot of tension between the prime minister of israel and the president of the united states. but all of that is entirely obama's fault. anything that's wrong with the u.s./israel relationship is obama's fault. the fact that the prime minister of israel has continued with a settlement policy which is extremely controversial in israel somehow comes no where into the equation. so we're supposed to believe on the one hand that america's supposed to lead the arab world from the front with one hand while adopting a policy toward israel that is more pro-israeli than anything any government in washington has articulated for a long time. how the two of them will go together i don't know. and for good measure, though-- and i think this is praiseworthy-- governor romney has called for a palestinian state an
to governments in need and they'll use it to purchase state bonds and bail out banks directly. analysts say they do expect one of the first tasks for those managers will be to purchase spanish sovereign bonds. well, imf economists zeroed in on the fiscal health of their host. they said planned increases in the consumption tax will not keep japan out of trouble. the economists released their latest report on the fiscal outlooks for various countries. they're predicting japan's debt will rise to nearly 2 1/2 times gdp in 2013 no. now, lawmakers passed a bill to double the consumption tax rate to 10% by 2015 but the imf report says that's just not enough and calling on leaders to carry out additional large-scale tax hikes along with spending cuts and saying japan really needs to generate at least a quarter of a trillion dollars in revenue over the next ten years. that would add up to more than 5% of gdp. here is an interesting sidenote. chinese bankers had planned to be here but they're going to be staying away. state-run xinhua news agency says the bankers are protesting against japan's natio
of government and private funds, young people are paid to work in the gardens and also learn to cook the food they grow. >> the other challenge is people don't really know what to do with food. you know, they're not sure how to cook fresh vegetables. so it's easier to buy meat and make french fries, right? and so what you end up with is kids who have full bellies, but they're starved. >> reporter: food deserts contribute to high rates of diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. the problem is particularly acute in areas where the only option for food shopping is a small neighborhood convenience store. >> we really need to care about the entire person, holistically. if we're just caring about a person's soul, their spiritual part, then we're not really caring about people. >> reporter: kevin brown grew up in holly grove, another neighborhood devastated by hurricane katrina. his father was the pastor of a church in the neighborhood. >> in our community, there was a high incidence of heart disease, diabetes and food-related illnesses. and so we envisioned using space that had been ruined b
kids with failing schools federal government, it is people closest to them, their parents, neighborhood, teachers, communities. we may not like that but you have to change the priorities. condoleezza rice says this should be the civil rights issue of our types. if you wait for college then you have adult issues. the -- >> that's not the issue -- >> it's so unfair to the -- >> with the supreme court we have to -- >> we have one without the other. >> we have to switch now we're out of time. let us know what you think. please follow me on twitter @bonnieerbe. from affirmative action to the latina vote. it's hispanic heritage month, and a reminder that candidates this year are doing all they can to court hispanic voters. [speaking spanish] but new data from the pew but new data from the pewhispanic center suggest even though 24 million latinos are eligible to vote, hispanic voter turnout will be closer to 10 million. but why? latino voters are much younger than other racial and ethnic groups. and latinos in california and texas, two states with high hispanic populations, may not see a vote
by different attitudes women have actually on size of government, issues and government policy generally, and one thing i think was interesting in this -- after the presidential debate, you saw on some polls the gender gap closeup when romney didn't talk about women at all and when they obsessed over it in the convention to me that was a sign that women like all other voters are really judging on the most important and central issue in this campaign, and that is the economy, when romney was more credible on that and gained with everyone including women. >> rose: chuck todd, will fact checkers tomorrow morning look at this and examine this and find out and suggest that somebody was either misleading or, quote, lying? >> i don't think there are any lies in there, my favorite part is when, you know, there is that one point where you have joe biden saying 97 percent of small businesses make $250,000 or less and paul ryan insisting 1 million businesses are affected by that and that is they are both ride but, right but want to use different numbers one wants to use raw data and the other perce
, this is charlie rose. >> rose: at the clinton global initiative business and government and ngos were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. >> and here at cgi you've made impressive commitments in this fight. we are especially honored to be joined by advocates who dedicate their lives and at times risk their lives to liberate victims and help them recover. >> rose: we begin with the recent conversation with the president of mexico, felipe calderon. you headed up the g20. what was that experience for you as an opportunity to engage others and focusing on big global problems? >> let me start by remembering the meeting we had in france in november 2011. it was a very disappointing one. we finished that without agreements, even without a sense of direction. so the problem seemed not only serious but also out of control. and then we started a process when mexico took over the head of the g20. we started a multiple processes in the sense that we beginning several ministerial meetings in order to put in a commonplace the different positions and try to close the gap between the
that he has tried to make about the red line and backing the obama administration and the u.s. government into a corner to make a particular statement about these red lines. he has not been successful at that even with his speech at the u.n. i raise that because the jewish vote does matter. let's be frank about it. more important or as important, and jewish money matters. the biggest giver in this campaign on the other side is they do, -- is a jew. the issue of israel is important as is always in u.s. foreign policy. how do you think that plays out in the election, particularly given that netanyahu has not been successful, but a significant number of jews who feel that obama has been disrespectful to netanyahu? >> let me back up on two quick points. i think it is important to distinguish the jewish money from pro-use real money. there are huge numbers of jews like me in the jewish community who have very diverse views on israel, who do not support u.s. military aid to israel, who don't support giving israel the kind of diplomatic support at the united nations, providing the kind of impuni
partners, owners and the government, so we have -- >> rose: government as a partner? >> in many cases. you know, they are -- they own the land and will be part and parcel of an ownership sometimes and they will diversify and difficult vest themselves of it. so we haven't found any difficulty. in the construction of it, we have had to really monitor it carefully to get the quality, but they eventually do reach that level of what -- >> rose: you mean things like importing marble from italy and that kind of stuff. >> they will but they want to use a lot of their own materials and their own suppliers, et cetera. so we have been able to reach the level of quality that is standard within the four systems, you know, realm of our control. >> rose: do you love the business? do you love it? >> i do. >> rose: do you get excited when you see a hotel? >> i do, because it is such a dynamic business, because you are dealing with people who work and people who use it, and the reaction you get from both of those is always a stimulating part of business and it is always different. >> rose: and how is it ch
was 23 and 24. >> as a reporter? >> as a reporter. it was the usual thing in mexico. the government would say what you could say on the air and what you couldn't say on the air. i decided i didn't want to be that kind of reporter so i sold everything and came to the united states. just imagine that now i can talk to anyone without asking permission for anything. i had to leave my country because of that. it used to be said that the powerful and the rich never leave their country, only those who need possibilities and those who are poor and those who are ambitious leave their countries. that's exactly what happened with me. i came here because i had to come here. something pushed me out of mexico and something pulled me from the united states. now i have two passports, but honestly i have to thank this country because it gave me all the wonderful opportunities. if i would have stayed in mexico, i don't know what would have happened but i would have been a very poor, sad and probably censored journalist. >> why did your parents come? >> my parents came in the 1940s and it was because my fat
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

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